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Sunday, November 19, 2006

Dark the stain...

Dark the stain that soiled man's nature,
Long the distance that he fell,
Far removed from hope and heaven
Near to deep despair and hell.

But there is a fountain opened,
And the blood of God's own Son
Purifies the soul, and reaches
Deeper than the stain has gone.


-- attributed to "Rev." Raymond Browning (written before or by 1928)

Upon the cross where Jesus died,
Where He for me was crucified
There love I see beyond compare,
And all my hope is centered there.

No other scene beneath the skies
Hath e'er appeared before mine eyes
That fills my heart with joy so sweet,
And moves with love that's so complete.

My heart is not on things below,
Its yearnings t'ward Mt. Calv'ry go;
Where love I see beyond compare,
And all my hope is centered there.

-- attributed to F. L. Eiland

Both songs above appeared in "Vaughan's Select Radio Specials" by the James D. Vaughan Publishing Co., Cleveland, TN 1947; it just seemed to me that they contain a little "deeper" theology than is often associated with a lot of southern gospel music.

2 comments:

clinch64 said...

Robert, you know it started out as being referred to simply as "gospel music". I don't know when the "southern" tag was added. Of course it originated in the South, so the combination would seem like a fit.

By the way, I'm sure you knew there is a Southern Gospel Hall of Fame and Museum at the entrance of the Dollywood theme park in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. One thing I thought was of special interest was a caricature of 4 individuals making up a quartet. They were singing a particular song, done in shape-notes. Naturally, it was on the 7 note scale.

Neil

R. L. Vaughn said...

It probably is actually a misnomer to refer to it as "southern gospel" before a certain period of time (although I don't know exactly when that time would be). But I think the term generally gets folks looking in the right general direction as far as a style.

Interesting about Dollywood.